2019–20 Departmental Results Report

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ISSN: 2561-2158

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Table of contents


Commissioner’s message

I am pleased to have this opportunity to once again share with Canadians information about our priorities, our activities and our results in implementing the external whistleblowing regime for the federal public sector.

At the end of the 2019–20 reporting year, we were in the very early stages of trying to understand and respond to a global pandemic that has now fundamentally changed the way we do our work and live our lives. This situation represents an enormous ongoing challenge for everyone, including those considering making a disclosure of wrongdoing or a complaint of reprisal. Our focus is to continue to provide consistent, dependable, professional service to all Canadians.

Our office provides an important service, and our success in providing that service requires that people know who we are and how to reach us, and that they trust us to handle their disclosures of wrongdoing and complaints of reprisal in a fair, neutral and confidential manner.

As this report shows, implementation of our core investigative mandate guided the allocation and use of our financial and human resources last year. We sought to balance efficiency and innovation, in both operational processes and approaches, as well as in reaching out to Canadians to ensure they have the information they need to make informed and confident decisions to come forward with disclosures and complaints.

As Commissioner, I am confident that our Office is prepared and well-positioned to take on the challenges that lie ahead during this time of pandemic. Our work is vitally important to the functioning of the federal public sector, and therefore to all Canadians, who rely on it perhaps now more than ever.


Joe Friday
Public Sector Integrity Commissioner

Results at a glance and operating context

The Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada (the Office) supports the duties of its Commissioner by ensuring disclosures of wrongdoing and complaints of reprisal are dealt with in a timely and effective manner, by raising awareness about the Office and the whistleblowing regime as well as ensuring public servants and members of the public have access to information to make an informed decision about disclosures of wrongdoing and complaints of reprisal.

Following the implementation of the Treasury Board Policy on Results, the Office adjusted its reporting structure and started using a new Departmental Results Framework. Under this new framework, the Office reports to Canadians on the results it aims to achieve in relation to its core responsibility, namely the handling of Public Sector Disclosures of Wrongdoing and Complaints of Reprisal. The Office is using 5 performance indicators to track progress on its results. The planned results, indicators and related targets, were outlined in the 2019–20 Departmental Plani.

This Departmental Results Report outlines the achievements of the Office’s results identified in the 2019–20 Departmental Plan and the resources that it allocated toward achieving these results.

Public Sector Disclosures of Wrongdoing and Complaints of Reprisal 2019–20

Key results achieved

  • Operational tools were developed to support efficiency and quality of service delivery;
  • The Office met or surpassed its service standardsii;
  • An action plan was implemented under the Office’s Legal Assistance Request Programiii to ensure timeliness in clients’ requests and program delivery measurements were improved;
  • Outreach and engagement efforts continued to increase awareness and inform public servants and members of the public about the Office’s mandate.

For more information on the Office’s plans, priorities and results achieved, see the “Results: what we achieved” section of this report.

Results: what we achieved

Core responsibility

Public Sector disclosures of wrongdoing and complaints of reprisal

Description

The Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada increases oversight of government operations by providing public servants and members of the public with an independent and confidential process for making disclosures of wrongdoing in, or relating to, the federal public sector. The Office receives and investigates these disclosures and reports founded cases of wrongdoing to Parliament and makes recommendations to chief executives on corrective measures. The Office also provides a mechanism for public servants and former public servants for making complaints of reprisal. It receives and investigates these complaints of reprisals and can refer cases to the Public Servants Disclosure Protection Tribunal.

Results

In 2019–20, the Office received 324 general inquiries, 142 new disclosures of wrongdoing and 52 new complaints of reprisal. These numbers are consistent with an upward trend of cases received in the past three years. The table below, published in our 2019–20 Annual Report to Parliamentiv, provides a summary of the Office’s overall operational activities throughout 2019–20.

The Office administers a contributions program established under the Public Servants Disclosure Protection Act to provide discretionary funding up to $3,000 for independent legal advice to individuals involved in disclosures of wrongdoing or reprisal complaints. In 2019–20, the Office received 68 requests for funding for legal advice under the Act and 21 of those requests were granted, surpassing the target of 15 set in the 2019–20 Departmental Planv.

Operational Activities in 2019–20

Summary of New Activities

Number of general inquiries received

324

Number of new disclosures of wrongdoing received

142

Number of new reprisal complaints received

52

Overall Disclosure Activities
Total number of disclosures of wrongdoing handled in 2019–20 180
- Number of new disclosures received 142
- Number of disclosures or investigations carried over from 2018–19 38
Number of files completed following an analysis 156
Number of investigations launched 11
Number of files resulting in a founded case of wrongdoing 1
- Number of recommendations made by the Commissioner for founded cases of wrongdoing 4
- Number of follow-ups made on recommendations 0*
- Number of recommendations actioned by chief executives 0*

*Our Case Report was tabled in March 2020, so we will follow up on the recommendations and actions that were taken over the next few months.

Overall Reprisal Activities
Total number of reprisal complaints handled in 2019–20 63
- Number of new complaints received 52
- Number of complaints or investigations carried over from 2018–19 11
Number of files completed following an analysis 55
Number of investigations launched 10
Number of files settled through conciliation 4
Number of applications to the Tribunal 0

In its 2019–20 Departmental Planvi, the Office focused on two specific areas to achieve the expected results and targets related to its core responsibility. This section describes how the Office performed against each result.

Results 1: Public sector disclosures of wrongdoing and complaints of reprisal are dealt with in a timely and effective manner.

In 2019–20, the Office met or surpassed its service standards and continued to focus on operational efficiency within its case analysis and investigations. In this regard, the Office developed new tools to support timeliness and quality of service delivery. With the goal of enhancing capacity with its investigations while maintaining the highest standards of procedural fairness and natural justice, the Office has put in place an initiative that engages employees in proposing new and innovative approaches to current operational processes.

The Office hired an external firm to conduct an evaluation of its operations. The evaluation report indicated that the Office’s work is effective and well managed and pointed to some areas for improvement. The Office’s Management response has established an action plan to ensure implementation of the recommendations over the next fiscal year.

In order to ensure that requests under the Office’s Legal Assistance Request Grants and Contributions Programvii are reviewed, actioned, managed and tracked in a timely fashion, the Office has implemented the 2018–20 Action Plan - Legal Assistance Request Program and has developed a new indicator to better track performance of this contribution program. This new indicator will capture the percentage of applications addressed within established service standard under the program. The implementation of the action plan has enabled the Office to undertake new measures including new initiatives to assist clients in choosing their lawyers, the simplification of communications and improvement of contracting processes with law firms.

Result 2: Public servants and members of the public are aware of the Office and have access to information to make an informed decision about disclosures of wrongdoing and/or complaints of reprisal.

Awareness of and trust in the Office play a vital role in ensuring that public servants and members of the public are able to disclose wrongdoing. Fear of reprisal continues to be a challenge and plays a fundamental role in an individual’s decision to disclose.

The Office has continued to increase awareness of the whistleblowing regime, clarify its role, and focus on building trust through its 2017–20 Outreach and Engagement Strategy.

In 2019–20, the Office took part in 23 activities connecting with more federal public servants and other Canadians, and providing them with accurate information on the federal whistleblowing regime. Face-to-face interactions with public servants contributed to building our reputation as an approachable organization, and offered an opportunity to distribute promotional and educational items directly to public servants.

The number of educational and promotional items distributed was lower than the previous year, which can most likely be attributed to the preference for accessing documents online rather than in hard copy. This trend is in line with Government efforts to increase sustainability by going paperless, and will be a factor in determining the number of educational items printed in the coming years.

The Office also continued its strategic use of social media as a vehicle for increasing awareness by drawing attention to case reports and events attended by its representatives.

In 2019–20, the Office updated its indicators under this result. The new indicators will capture the number of attendees at outreach events as well as the percentage of unique new visitors to the website as compared to overall visitors, which will help measure the impact of outreach activities. These new indicators are listed in the 2020–21 Departmental Planviii available on our website.

Experimentation

As a micro organization with limited financial and human resources, the Office did not conduct any experimentation in 2019–20.

Results achieved

Departmental results

Performance indicators

Target

Date to achieve target

2017–18
Actual results

2018–19
Actual results

2019–20
Actual results

Public sector disclosures of wrongdoing and complaints of reprisal are dealt with in a timely and effective manner.

Percentage of cases addressed within established service standardsix. Service standards are available on the Office website.

100%

March, 2020

100%

100%

100%

Percentage of recommendations actioned by chief executives following investigation findings.

100%

March, 2020

Not Available

N/A

No Case Report was tabled

100%

Number of persons benefiting from Legal Advice Requests to support their involvement in a disclosure of wrongdoing and/or a complaint of reprisal.

15

March, 2020

Not Available

8

21

Public servants and members of the public are aware of the Office and have access to information to make an informed decision about disclosures of wrongdoing and/or complaints of reprisal

Number of outreach events attended and communications products/items distributed through various means.

5,000

March, 2020

Not Available

5,629

3,823

Number of website visitors.

30,000

March, 2020

Not Available

31,220

25,285*

* Data for website visitors not available from May 11 to September 17 due to a technical problem that occurred when the website was migrate. This period has been pro-rated based on data from the past 5 fiscal years.

Notes
  1. The Office adjusted and created new performance indicators in 2017–18. No actual results are available as fiscal year 2017–18 was serving as a baseline to establish targets.
  2. For the next fiscal year, we will be comparing the percentage of new website visitors compared to overall visits, which should provide a more accurate representation of how many individuals are being reached as a result of outreach activities.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2019–20
Main Estimates
2019–20
Planned spending
2019–20
Total authorities available for use
2019–20
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2019–20
Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)
$3,674,535 $3,674,535 $3,609,736 $3,586,396 ($88,139)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Actual full-time equivalents
2019–20
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
29 21 (8)

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada’s Program Inventory is available in GC InfoBasex.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are:

  • Acquisition Management Services
  • Communication Services
  • Financial Management Services
  • Human Resources Management Services
  • Information Management Services
  • Information Technology Services
  • Legal Services
  • Material Management Services
  • Management and Oversight Services
  • Real Property Management Services

Results

The Office strives for continuous improvement of efficiency in delivering its internal services to support the organization and contribute to the achievement of its results. In order to meet its current and future operational needs, the Office completed a refit and relocation of its workplace. The new office space promotes sustainable design principles, employee wellness and provides a productive work environment.

The Office also updated its information technology and information management software and hardware to ensure the continued safeguarding of information. In March 2020, in response to COVID-19, IM/IT efforts focused on improving the capacity and tools to facilitate remote working.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2019–20
Main Estimates

2019–20
Planned spending

2019–20
Total authorities available for use

2019–20
Actual spending
(authorities used)

2019–20
Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)

$1,852,851

$1,852,851

$2,104,214

$1,812,205

($40,646)

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Actual full-time equivalents
2019–20
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
7 8 1

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

Departmental spending trend graph

The following graph presents planned (voted and statutory spending) over time.

Departmental spending trend graph DRR 2019-2020
Text version
Fiscal year Statutory Voted Total
2017–18 431,723 4,508,616 4,940,339
2018–19 418,784 5,202,328 5,621,112
2019–20 438,151 4,960,450 5,398,601
2020–21 536,352 5,045,978 5,582,330
2021–22 536,352 5,045,978 5,582,330
2022–23 536,352 5,045,978 5,582,330
Budgetary performance summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)

Core responsibilities and Internal Services

2019–20
Main Estimates

2019–20
Planned spending

2020–21
Planned spending

2021–22
Planned spending

2019–20
Total authorities available for use

2017–18
Actual spending
(authorities used)

2018–19
Actual spending
(authorities used)

2019–20
Actual spending
(authorities used)

Public sector disclosures of wrongdoing and complaints of reprisal

$3,674,535

$3,674,535

$3,539,794

$3,539,794

$3,609,736

$3,262,750

$3,184,253

$3,586,396

Internal Services

$1,852,851

$1,852,851

$2,042,536

$2,042,536

$2,104,214

$1,677,589

$2,436,859

$1,812,205

Total

$5,527,386

$5,527,386

$5,582,330

$5,582,330

$5,713,950

$4,940,339

$5,621,112

$5,398,601

The Office total actual spending decreased by $222,511 (4.0%) from 2018–19 to 2019–20. The difference can be attributed to a one-time higher construction cost incurred in 2018–19 for the new office space. This construction was finalized in the beginning of 2019–20 and the subsequent relocation of all employees was completed within the first quarter.

In 2019–20 the actual spending was $128,785 (2.3%) below the planned spending. This was mainly a result of a decrease in our planned full-time equivalent levels. The planned hiring in our Departmental Plan was based on an estimated increase in files. The increase was lower than anticipated and as a result, so were our staffing needs.

The Office currently plans to spend nearly $5.5 million in 2020–21, which represents its entire budget. This is driven by planned hiring of new employees and further upgrades to its information technology capacity and tools for improving remote work. However, with the existing COVID-19 travel restrictions and other changes in working habits, there remains some uncertainty about future spending.

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for core responsibilities and Internal Services

Core responsibilities and Internal Services

2017–18
Actual full-time equivalents

2018–19
Actual full-time equivalents

2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents

2019–20
Actual full-time equivalents

2020–21
Planned full-time equivalents

2021–22
Planned full-time equivalents

Public sector disclosures of wrongdoing and complaints of reprisal

22

21

29

21

24

24

Internal Services

7

7

7

8

8

8

Total

29

28

36

29

32

32

Full‑time equivalents remained constant from 2018–19 to 2019–20 as a result of a decrease in our planned FTEs as mentioned previously.

Full‑time equivalents are expected to increase slightly from 2019–20 to 2020–21 to correspond with the consistent upward trend of cases received in past years.

Expenditures by vote

For information on the Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada’s organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2019–20.xi

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of the Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada’s spending with the Government of Canada’s spending and activities is available in GC InfoBase.xii

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

The Office of the Public Sector integrity Commissioner of Canada’s financial statements for the year ended March 31, 2020, are available on the Office websitexiii.

Financial statement highlights

Expenses in the Financial Statements are prepared on an accrual basis, while figures in other previous sections were prepared on an expenditures basis. The difference between the figures in the different sections is the result of accrual entries, such as the recognition of services provided without charge by other government departments, the acquisition of tangible capital assets and related amortization expenses, and accrued liability adjustments.

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2020 (dollars)

Financial information

2019–20
Planned results

2019–20
Actual results

2018–19
Actual results

Difference
(2019–20 Actual results minus
2019–20 Planned results)

Difference
(2019–20 Actual results minus
2018–19 Actual results)

Total expenses

6,326,881

5,989,464

5,595,710

337,417

393,754

Total revenues

0

0

0

0

0

Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers

6,326,881

5,989,464

5,595,710

337,417

393,754

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as of March 31, 2020 (dollars)

Financial information

2019–20

2018–19

Difference
(2019–20 minus
2018–19)

Total net liabilities

1,176,654

1,513,636

(336,982)

Total net financial assets

704,673

1,118,809

(414,136)

Departmental net debt

471,981

394,827

77,154

Total non-financial assets

1,039,367

866,653

172,714

Departmental net financial position

567,386

471,826

95,560

The difference of $337,417 in total expenses between planned and actual results for 2019–20 is primarily the result of a decrease in our planned full-time equivalent levels.

The Office’s liabilities consist mainly of accounts payable to other government departments and agencies related to the Office relocation project, salaries for employees on assignment at the Office and to accrued salaries and wages to be paid from authorities in future years. The decrease of $336,982 in total liabilities from 2018–19 to 2019–20 is mostly due to a decrease in account payable to other government departments.

The Office’s assets consist mainly of the amounts due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund that may be disbursed without further charges to the Office’s authorities. The decrease of $414,136 in total net financial assets from 2018–19 to 2019–20 is mostly the result of a decrease in the amount due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund because of the decrease in accounts payables.

The Office’s net debt represents the difference between the Office net liabilities and net financial assets.

The Office’s non-financial assets consist mainly of tangible capital assets. The increase of $172,714 from 2018–19 to 2019–20 is mostly due to the offsetting difference between the work in progress related to the construction of the new office during fiscal year 2018–19 and the leasehold improvements recorded in 2019–20.

The increase of $95,560 in the net financial position, which is the difference between total non-financial assets and the net debt, is therefore attributable to the increase in tangible capital assets, which is partially offset by the increase in accounts payables to other government departments.

Additional information

Organizational profile

Minister: The Honourable Jean-Yves Duclos, President of the Treasury Board

Institutional head: Joe Friday, Public Sector Integrity Commissioner

Ministerial portfolio: Treasury Board Secretariat

Enabling instrument: Public Servants Disclosure Protection Actxiv

Year of incorporation / commencement: 2007

Other: The Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada supports the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner, who is an independent Agent of Parliament

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

“Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do” is available on the Office’s websitexv.

Reporting framework

The Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada’s Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2019–20 are shown below.

Reporting Framework 2020
Text version
  • Departmental Results Framework
    • Core Responsibility: Public sector disclosures of wrongdoing and complaints of reprisal
      • Departmental Result: Public sector disclosures of wrongdoing and complaints of reprisal are dealt with in a timely and effective manner
        • Indicator: Percentage of cases addressed within established service standards
        • Indicator: Percentage of recommendations actioned by chief executives following investigation findings
        • Indicator: Number of persons benefiting from legal advice requests to support their involvement in a disclosure of wrongdoing and/or a complaint of reprisal
      • Departmental Result: Public servants and members of the public are aware of the Office and have access to information to make an informed decision about disclosures of wrongdoing and/or complaints of reprisal
        • Indicator: Number of outreach events attended and communications products/items distributed through various means
        • Indicator: Number of website visitors
  • Program Inventory
    • Program: Disclosure and Reprisal Management
  • Internal Services

Supporting information on the program inventory

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada’s Program Inventory is available in GC InfoBase.xvi

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada’s website:

  • Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures.xvii This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada
60 Queen Street, 4th Floor
Ottawa, Ontario  K1P 5Y7
Canada
613-941-6400 or 1-866-941-6400 (toll-free)
info@psic-ispc.gc.ca


Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
core responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a core responsibility are reflected in one or more related departmental results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a 3-year period. Departmental Plans are usually tabled in Parliament each spring.
departmental priority (priorité)
A plan or project that a department has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired departmental results.
departmental result (résultat ministériel)
A consequence or outcome that a department seeks to achieve. A departmental result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.
departmental result indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A quantitative measure of progress on a departmental result.
departmental results framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
A framework that connects the department’s core responsibilities to its departmental results and departmental result indicators.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on a department’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
experimentation (expérimentation)
The conducting of activities that seek to first explore, then test and compare the effects and impacts of policies and interventions in order to inform evidence-based decision-making, and improve outcomes for Canadians, by learning what works, for whom and in what circumstances. Experimentation is related to, but distinct from innovation (the trying of new things), because it involves a rigorous comparison of results. For example, using a new website to communicate with Canadians can be an innovation; systematically testing the new website against existing outreach tools or an old website to see which one leads to more engagement, is experimentation.
full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. For a particular position, the full-time equivalent figure is the ratio of number of hours the person actually works divided by the standard number of hours set out in the person’s collective agreement.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical process used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people experience policies, programs and services based on multiple factors including race ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2019–20 Departmental Results Report, those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2019 Speech from the Throne, namely: Fighting climate change; Strengthening the Middle Class; Walking the road of reconciliation; Keeping Canadians safe and healthy; and Positioning Canada for success in an uncertain world.
horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative where two or more federal organizations are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally, a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead to the expected result.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in Main Estimates.
A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
program (programme)
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
program inventory (répertoire des programmes)
Identifies all the department’s programs and describes how resources are organized to contribute to the department’s core responsibilities and results.
result (résultat)
A consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an appropriation act. The vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.